Archives For distribution

A few months ago I began a new type of series here on the blog: article roundups. Why? Well, we’ve covered a lot of topics on the site in the last six years. The roundups are meant to gather similar posts in one easy-to-digest serving.

The first roundups covered the two most popular questions I receive from readers: How to Sell Sound Effects and Sound FX Library Ideas & How to Choose Them. The third most common question follows a similar theme:

Where should I sell my sound effects?

How can I choose the best sound library partner?

What is the best website to distribute my sound clips?

How do you find good sound fx distributors?

So, today’s article will share previous posts about sound fx library distributors. It will also include new tips that will help you learn how to choose the best sound stores to sell your clip collections.

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Moody Construction

Over the Christmas break I had time to think about what sound effects articles would help you best.

My main goal for this website is to help other people bring better, more inspiring sound into the world.

Last year I wrote mostly about the side of field recording that concerns capturing sound effects: field recording technique. I shared a few posts that explained my approach to gathering field recordings, what makes sound effects valuable, and how to master them afterwards.

I also explored how less tangible elements contribute to superior field recordings: influencing ‘passive’ sessions, and adding personality to your tracks.

(Read an article roundup.)

This year I’d like to try something different.

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Venice Rooftops

Last week we looked at how to begin field recording on a budget. We saw how to:

  • Assemble a basic field recording kit.
  • Build a sound effects collection.
  • Use sound isolation tricks to improve your sound clips.
  • Join and contribute to the field recording community.

Have you been recording sound effects for some time? Have you gathered a substantial sound effects library? Still excited every time you power up your recorder?

Well, what’s next? You may have these questions:

  • Can you find work as a field recordist?
  • Is it possible to shape a career working with sound effects?
  • What options do you have for finding work?
  • How can you break into the industry?

In today’s post I’ll share how to make field recording and sound effects a larger part of your life.

And, if you wish, you can choose to have your sound library and your field recording wizardry support you.

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Toronto in Fog

I read an interesting question on Social Sound Design this morning. It asked whether selling a sound effects library on your own website was viable. Would one pack be downloaded ten, 100, or 500 times?

I added a few thoughts of my own, and shared my experience selling sound effects on the Web. At the end of the post, I mentioned that recording rare sound effects with reflection and effort give a sound library an advantage.

I thought about this last bit as I grabbed my coffee later. I think there’s more to add.

So, in this post I’ll answer a few questions I often hear from new field recordists.

  • How do I build a sound effects library?
  • Which sound effects should I record?
  • What makes one sound effect more valuable than another?
  • How can this help me share my sound library on the Web?

I’ll share what I learned, the path I took, and some ideas how you can shape a powerful sound library of your own.

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Around 1999 I unexpectantly entered the world of e-commerce. I had previously been a sound editor and assistant and occasional yet passionate field recordist for my infant sound effects company Airborne Sound.

By an odd twist of fate I began mastering sound effects for a company that sold sound fx online.

Since then I’ve learned a lot about how to sell sound effects on the Web. I found it fascinating to see how people respond to distributing or sharing sound (for sale or otherwise). It’s also satisfying to use technology to give people creative tools and for them to walk away happy.

This year I started writing about e-commerce and sound clips. I call the series ‘Selling Sound Effects.’ I covered topics like improving your sound effects library, your sound fx website, distribution and mistakes to avoid when selling sound.

Here’s a link roundup of my e-commerce Selling Sound Effects articles:

Any aspect of selling sound effects you’d like to read about in 2012? Let me know in the comments.

Don’t forget, if you want to read the articles in your email inbox, you’ll need to resubscribe at this link to receive posts after February 1st.

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Joshua Tree National Park at Sunset 2

In the last article I wrote that knowing your audience is the first, key step in knowing how to make small changes that will have a big impact on your sound library. It helps you focus a new sound library or correct the course of a library you may already have.

In this article I’ll mention specifics changes you can make.

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Joshua Tree National Park Sunset

In my last article I wrote about a book called The Tipping Point by Malcolm Gladwell. A “tipping point” is a small change that has a large effect. I applied the idea to downloadable sound effect websites.

This week I’ll look at what small changes you can make to cause a big difference in the quality of your sound library.

I’ll be writing mostly for people who want to sell or distribute their library, though I think the ideas can be applied to improving sound libraries generally.

In my next article I’ll share some examples of what specific small changes you can make.

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Joshua Tree National Park

Are you proud of sound effects you’ve created and want to share them? Wondering if your field recordings can make it into the hands of talented people?

Maybe you want to build a web store, a sound map, or perhaps a new freesound.org to share your creations with the world. Maybe you’ve started a sound blog and want to exchange ideas with more of the community.

Or perhaps you are already sharing and haven’t had much response.

I sell sound effect downloads at my website, airbornesound.com. While creating it I learned a valuable lesson: small changes can tip a sound effects library from obscurity to success.

Although this idea is often mentioned with marketing in mind, I think it applies to many topics. I’ll write about three I’ve noticed. I’ll start today with revisions to your web site. This will be helpful if you’re trying to share sounds or writing on the Internet.

The next post will look at small changes to make your sound library better. My last post will discuss how this idea can affect your creativity.
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In my last post I wrote about three mistakes you can avoid when recording sound effects for publishing.

Here are three more points to keep in mind to ensure things run smoothly. At the end of this post I’ll also include some general ideas about watching for and fixing mistakes.

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I have been field recording sound effects for Airborne Sound since just a bit before the dot com boom. There was no manual for how to survive as a field recordist. There definitely wasn’t an explanation for selling sound effects on line.

Field recording can be an incredible, immersive art. Collaborating recording sound effects is a great experience. When field recording and selling sound effects is brought into the world of online publishing and e-commerce you have to be more thoughtful though, as with any business. When creating and money mix, situations can easily become tricky.

Here are a couple of lessons I’ve learned or witnessed along the way. I’m sharing them to help beginners avoid mistakes when starting building a library or sharing sound effects downloads online. Keep them in mind to stay positive and keep things smooth.

In this post I’ll start with three mistakes. In my next post I’ll talk about three more. I’ll also discuss some general principles to keep in mind when looking out for and resolving mistakes.

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