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Last week I shared a roundup of articles I had written that share how to sell sound effects.

That’s one of the most popular questions I receive from readers. What’s the second-most popular question? Unsurprisingly, it asks about the next step in selling sound fx libraries:

  • What’s the best topic or theme for my first sound fx library?
  • What is the best subject for a sound collection?
  • What title is best for a new sound clip library?
  • How do I find a good idea for a new sound fx library?

Today’s post will be a roundup of advice I’ve shared to answer that question both here, and on other websites.

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how-to-sell-sound-effects-v2

It’s quite exciting to see many field recordists and sound designers eager to begin sharing sound fx with the community. I receive many emails from people curious about selling sound.

Writing about sharing field recordings on the Web is one of my favourite article topics. However, as the site grows larger, those posts are a bit trickier to find amongst the other articles.

That may be why I still receive many questions about sharing sound, such as:

  • How do I sell sound effects?
  • How do I create a sound fx library?
  • How do I design a sound effect library?

Those are all good questions. So, it’s time for a refresher. Today’s article is a roundup of all previous posts about sharing sound.

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Sony PCM-D100 Angle

I've been meaning to write a review of the Sony's PCM-D100 portable audio recorder for some time now.

The D100 is the successor to Sony's popular PCM-D50 model. The D50 is known for its excellent sound quality, impressive battery life, and sturdy construction. How does the PCM-D100 (US$775) measure up to its older brother? This article will take a "deep dive" into the D100 to learn what's new, what's changed, and how it performs in the field. It also includes dozens of field recordings from the D100 and other recorders that you can download and experiment with yourself. So, settle in and join me to explore this popular portable audio recorder.

Please note, I'm very detailed. This is an in-depth review that will take approximately 24 minutes to read. If you prefer, click the link below to email yourself a copy to read later.


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Best Posts of 2016

2017/01/04

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Every year I summarize the most popular posts from the year before. I also include a few favourites I’ve enjoyed writing.

Let’s take a look.

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Recording Jet Airliners in the UK

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Earlier this month I released the free Jet Fly Bys sound effects library over on Airborne Sound. I explained that I had captured those field recordings when I found myself living beneath the flight path of an international airport.

A reader recently wrote me to tell me he tried the same technique after reading the post here. Chris Procopiou lives near Heathrow Airport outside of London, England. He described his experience recording his own jet airliners in a post on his blog. And here's a bonus: he's offering them to the community free of charge. Check them out!

Read the article on Chris' blog and download the sound library.

Los Angeles Smokey

It's a running joke between my brother and I: he's always found himself living in places with too much noise and I'm trying to find places with a lot of it.

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motivations-2-0

Why do field recordists capture sound effects?

The last post revealed that many sound pros record audio for the chase: they gather sounds for a specific purpose, or to claim a technical achievement. They use their skill to preserve these sounds. And, for others, they gather audio to amplify their experience of the world around them.

That post looked at how sound itself motivates field recordists. Many are inspired by other, more nebulous reasons, too. So, today’s posts will look at the abstract elements that inspire sound pros: the art of field recording.

Please note: this post explores this idea in depth. It will take you about 15 minutes to read this article. If you’d prefer, click the button below to email the article to yourself to read later.


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A brief update: I’ve created a page for Creative Field Recording on Facebook. Most of the posts will be mirrored from the site or from on Twitter. However, if you’d prefer to follow me on Facebook, you’re now able to. Follow and Like Creative Field Recording on Facebook.

I have also created a dedicated YouTube channel for Creative Field Recording. Right now it has a few screencasts from past articles. I’d like to post more video content on the site. So, follow Creative Field Recording on YouTube to learn about future videos. Stay tuned for upcoming tutorials, location videos, and more.

You can also follow me on Twitter, SoundCloud, or connect via LinkedIn.

motivations-1-0

Over a year ago I began the “A Month of Field Recording” series with the hope that it would help new field recording fans choose gear more easily. Would equipment selections from the featured field recordists share insight on how to slice through the endless kit options and choose kit more simply? Through the generosity of 49 field recordists (series 2015, series 2016), we certainly found out.

By the time the series was well underway, I realized that something surprising was being revealed. Despite limiting most questions to field recording gear, a common theme shone through the cracks between the kilohertz and the preamp clarity. What became increasingly evident was that the thoughtful, varied equipment choices were matched by something as equally diverse: their motivations for capturing audio beyond the studio.

So, today’s post will explore a subject just as important as decisions about ease of interface and external inputs: the reason these pros suit up to step outside the studio into the world of sound.

Please note: this post explores this idea in depth. It will take you about 8 minutes to read this article. If you prefer, click the button below to email the article to yourself to read later.


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frank-bry

Today I am very happy to feature a special surprise final guest to the “A Month of Field Recordist” series.

Frank Bry has been field recording for game audio and sound fx publishers since the 1990s. He has been an inspiration for the field recording community. He has generously described techniques for capturing tricky sound effect subjects on his blog and on Designing Sound. He shares his work in pristine sound fx libraries hosted on his Web shop. He has been a pioneer of the indie sound effect library movement that has reshaped the way sound effects are shared worldwide.

Frank kindly shared his thoughts on field recording here on the blog back in 2013. Today he graciously agreed to describe his kit and the workflow he uses to capture his field recordings.

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