Rifles

Lately I’ve written a lot about creating sound effect libraries. In an interview with A Sound Effect, I mentioned that many sound collections begin when a sound editor notices certain sounds are missing.

This is exactly how the Free Firearm Library began. Of course, many of you know this library. It has received a lot of press and support from the community. The library has been downloaded by many sound pros. The crew behind the library, Still North SoundFX, recently mentioned that library clips were used in Boardwalk Empire.

The library also offers something more than tricky sound clips, however. The reason why it was created and how it was done provides insight for audio pros interested in sharing sound themselves. How?

Well, we’re all familiar with the sound of Hollywood-style suppressed gunshots. Ben Jaszczak and Brian Nelson of Still North SoundFX knew silencers sounded differently. They were determined to capture realistic-sounding suppressed gunshots. To do this, they turned to the community to support the project with what became a popular Kickstarter campaign.

So, what’s interesting is that the library grew from a need to record a specific sound effect that was difficult to capture: suppressed gunshots. Also, the Firearm Library involved the community intimately by using a tool rarely seen when creating new collections: Kickstarter.com.

It’s been some time since the library was released. I recently reached out to Jaszczak and Nelson to hear their reflections on these ideas. They kindly shared their time answering questions about recording the gun library, working with the community, and their plans for the future.

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Hamburg Rathaus

Earlier this year I interviewed Stuart Fowkes about his intriguing website, Cities and Memory. Fowkes’s site gathers field recording submissions from sound artists worldwide and places them on a soundmap. In an interesting twist, the site also introduces a collaborative aspect: other artists can remix the recordings and present the two versions side by side.

The concept brought the website a lot of attention. Now, Cities and Memory is hosting a project that you may be interested in checking out. It’s called Hamburg: A day in sound. What’s the deal?

A Creative Soundmap of Hamburg, Germany

Well, during a week in October, recordists captured the urban sounds of Hamburg, Germany. On November 3rd, 32 musicians and sound artists from ten countries will introduce their recordings over a 24-hour period.

The result? The idea is that these recordings will grow, combine, and reveal a focused sonic portrait of a week-in-the-life of a single city, both real and imagined.

An Exploration of a Week of Time

That’s an ambitious approach. How will a fixed week of time in one place will be presented across 24 hours? Will it be a literal snapshot of Hamburg? Will it be adapted? Will the events recorded during that week be presented via some kind of storytelling, perhaps in a sequence of events, or maybe an evolution of sound? Will that be built consciously, or will the recordings evolve unpredictably into something new? It’s a cool idea because it will show the potential for field recordings as precise as city atmospheres to grow beyond the moment when they’re captured.

It will be interesting to hear how much of the creator appears in each sample. Will the original field recordist’s work shine through? Will the adaptations display more about the artist’s interpretation, or a clearer image of the city?

We’ll find out soon. Check it out: the results will appear on their site on Monday from 12 noon GMT (translate to your time zone) on November 3rd to the next day at noon.

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A brief update: I recently added about a dozen new sound clip Web shops to the Community Sound FX Libraries page. It’s a bit more presentable, too.

I revisited the sites while updating the list. It’s a good way to discover what’s out there. As I did so, I noticed that there’s a few perhaps less-well-known sites that have some incredible libraries. There are some real gems buried in there. In particular, there’s a wide selection of guns and cars. There are also new nature recordists with some truly evocative recordings.

It’s also interesting to note that the count is now at 66 independent sound library stores. That’s pretty incredible. Two years ago half of these didn’t exist.

I believe the list is pretty much up to date. Thanks to everyone who has submitted a website. If I have missed your independent Web shop, please contact me via the sound fx library submission page.

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Galaxy Hero

You’ve conjured inspiring audio in the studio and in the streets. You’ve mixed and mastered the tracks. You’ve gathered your best selections into an impressive sound library. Now it’s time to share your sound effects and music with your peers and fans. But how do you do this?

The last article described how to create an indie sound effects bundle. Today’s post explains how to share your new sound library from your own online Web shop.

Have no idea what a Web shop is? Don’t have the slightest clue how to begin sharing a sound library? Don’t worry. This post will introduce you to Web shops, explain how they work, and share five types you can choose from.

This post is an abridged chapter from my recently released book called Sharing Sound Online. It’s about building a bulletproof sound bundle and sharing it from your own Web shop.

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Galaxy Hero

These days, it’s typical to edit audio and send finished show reels digitally to colleagues a half dozen time zones away. Capturing field recordings at 192 kilohertz is routine. It’s common to source fresh sound effects from talented recordists living on the other side of the globe.

This digital revolution has evolved sound effects libraries over the past fifty years from vinly records to bursting online archives of hundreds of thousands of clips.

And now? Focused libraries known as sound effects bundles are shared on a growing number of independent websites. They are crafted by the masters of sound design and field recording that surround us. We hear their work in films, television, and games. We work with them. We share ideas with them online. Most importantly, the greatest impact of the sound bundle format is that this collection of people also includes you.

Do you want to list your field recordings or sound design clips online? Are you eager to share your ideas through audio with other pros? Want to learn how to build a collection of clips and sell them on the Web? Sound bundles make this possible. Today’s article explains.

This post describes what sound bundles are, and how they are different. It includes a step-by-step guide that teaches you how to build an exceptional sound bundle yourself.

This post is the first of a two-part series of abridged chapters from my recently released book called Sharing Sound Online, which describes how to build a bulletproof sound bundle and share it from your own Web shop.

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Sharing Sound Online Group

It’s been a while since I posted here regularly. That’s because I’ve poured all my energy into writing a new e-book about sharing sound effects and field recordings.

It’s called Sharing Sound Online and it’s available now in the Creative Field Recording bookstore.

Sharing Sound Online is an e-book that explains how to build an indie sound bundle and share it from your own Web store. It collects all my knowledge of selling sound on the Internet since 2000, and presents hundreds of tricks and tips.

I wrote this book because I know many of you have excellent sound effects that are waiting to be discovered. I’m excited about the book because I think it is an extremely simple way to help everyone move their great collections out into the world to be enjoyed by listeners everywhere.

It’s the result of a solid three-and-a-half months of writing. I’m very excited to finally share it with you today.

This post will be a brief overview of the book. I’ll also be publishing two articles (article one, article two) with info from the book, starting today. At the end of the post, I’ll also include a discount code for 15% off the new book, which is good for the next 48 hours.

Interested in learning how to build an exceptional sound bundle and share it with thousands of sound pros on the Web? Read on.

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DVD Hero

The Compact Disc introduced the first widely accepted digital audio format. It became popular partially because of improved audio quality. There were other reasons, too. Listening and accessing the audio was also far more convenient than the previous vinyl and cassette formats.

The Compact Disc has reigned as the dominant physical audio format since it was introduced to the public in 1982. Even in 2007, over 200 billion CDs were sold.

Of course, digital sound file delivery is overtaking physical optical disc shipments. However, the CD format set a fidelity standard that has lasted for over 30 years. In one way or another, this has affected every sound pro.

As sound professionals, we know how greatly higher fidelity sound affects our work. Higher sampling rates allow more flexibility in sound design. Higher bit rates increase dynamic, and, generally speaking, make sound clips appear more full, lush, and rich. But does high fidelity audio really matter to listeners?

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The Southern Milky Way Above ALMA

It’s fantastic to see that the last year has experienced an explosion of new field recording content. We’re seeing more sound fx libraries are appearing in indie Web shops, more clips on SoundCloud, valuable ideas in podcasts, blog articles, and more.

Our field recording community remains fairly spread out, however. Earlier I had created three pages here on the site to keep track of all of these websites:

Thank you to everyone who has sent me links to share with others.

Check out those pages to find new blogs, listen to sound fx libraries, and connect with others on SoundCloud.

Submitting Websites to the Lists

Things are evolving so quickly that it’s hard to catch every new site that launches. This week I created a new page to help.

Want to list your website here? Do you have a favourite blog you’d like to share? Have I missed a cool site you’ve discovered?

Send me your websites on the new field recording community website submission form page. That form just makes it a bit easier to send me your Web shops, SoundCloud groups, or field recording news sites. That means it will appear on the site faster.

Submit a site there to share it with the rest of the community.





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New Sound Effects Sharing Book Arriving Soon - Stack of Books

I’ve often written here that I believe that the entire craft of pro audio improves as more exceptional sound libraries surround us. I believe our field recording community is packed with talented people who capture clips that will inspire us all.

Earlier this year I decided to put my money where my ideas were. Why not put that concept into practice? So, for the past two months I’ve been writing a book that explains how to do two things:

  1. Build an exceptional indie sound library bundle.
  2. Host that collection on a website you own.

The goal of the book is to help everyone share their creations with fans worldwide and find freedom while doing so.

In this post I’ll explain the broad strokes of the project.

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